The Northern Lights

My journey back was not smooth at all. I was frustrated that nothing seemed to be going my way. I remember looking up and just thinking wow. At first it looked like a faint grey light and then would turn into this beautiful aurora. It’s at times like this, I remembered that I’m in such an incredible place. 

I saw them a few times, once on the icecap when we were building a wall for the storm at 0200, on the East and West Coast. This photo was taken by the hostel manager on the east coast on his iPhone. 

The journey back was still challenging, especially when I was feeling physically and mentally tired. When we finally got off the Greenland Icecap, I wanted to get home as soon as possible. 

I spent a few days on the phone to Air Greenland trying to get 2 of us on a flight that had 1 space, I managed to get us on the flight. We took a pretty rough 1hr boat ride (open boat, no life jackets). I held my breath every-time I saw a big wave coming toward us! 2hrs before the flight, we were told it was delayed and had to wait in Kulusuk for 3 days, a small town on the East Coast with approx 240 inhabitants. 

I was frustrated at this point, I just wanted to get back. None of the return journey went smoothly. Our hotel booking was messed up on the West coast so we were waiting outside at 2200 for the hostel owner to find us different accommodation. 

Our luggage (which we sent at the start of the expedition to the west) with our clean clothes in had been sent back to the east a few days before we arrived. So I was still in my expedition clothes.

Sometimes you just have to laugh (or cry!). It was so nice to get home and get into clean clothes. I still don’t have my luggage (with the clean clothes) but hoping I’ll get it back in the next few weeks). 

Every part of this trip was an adventure, even the times that I was not on the ice cap. I just have to remember that wherever I am, just to take a minute, appreciate how I got there and take it all in! 

Mental Health Awareness

A few people in my life have been struggling with their mental health recently. People have also spoken to me about feeling low as they are unable to see family, friends or have had holidays or events cancelled. However, they feel bad because so many people are in a worse position. 

I don’t think we should feel bad or make each other feel bad for feeling low at a time like this. It is completely understandable to feel this way. Be kind to yourself and take one step at a time. 

I used to think not talking about my emotions made me stronger, I didn’t want to appear ‘weak.’ It doesn’t matter how strong and resilient you are, keeping it all inside can be overwhelming. What I’ve learnt is this, talking more about my emotions has just made me stronger. I am so grateful to all the people in my life that support me. Thank you.

I’m in the middle of my MSc and one of the modules I’m taking is Exercise Medicine. One of the components is physical activity and mental health. National guidelines recommend physical activity for persistent mild-moderate depression in group settings with support from an instructor, typically 3 session per week. This is not as easy with social distancing however there are more and more classes available online. I know more than a few adults that love PT with Joe.

If I’m feeling low, these are some of the things that help me:

Staying in touch – It’s more difficult know that we’re inside but keep in touch with people over the phone or online. Feel free to send me a message if you don’t know who to talk to.

I know I always feel better after speaking to my niece over zoom. We played snakes and ladders today, she won this round. I’ll get payback next week. I usually travel a lot and have great people in my life that keep me company at 0200, during long trips or when I am waiting at the airport (the picture at the airport below was pre-isolation..)

Be more active – if you feel up to it, go for a short walk or join in one of the many classes online. I know that this is easier said than done. I’m usually really active and find it difficult to slow down. Just take one step at a time, even sitting for less periods will be helpful. 

Try to maintain a healthy diet – I always find I eat better when I have planned my meals. My mum is diabetic and has started doing the same. 

Have a routine – Its easy to get into poor sleeping patterns. Try keeping a diary to help you with routine. This can include meals and physical activity. I have a training routine when I have something I am training for. I am currently still training for my next training expedition. 

Make mini goals – something you have control over. ‘Today I will get out of bed and have a shower’. Recently mine have been ‘complete my essay and prepare for exams!’ I like to move around and have recently been enjoying revising outside sat on my roll mat. Or build a fort – I was very proud and excited by our bed sheet fort (see pic below).

I am by no means any kind of expert, these are just some of the things that helped me in the past. Spending two months in Antarctica alone will definitely be challenging and I will do all of the things above to help me prepare. 

If you’re struggling, please reach out and talk to someone. You are not alone.

My quote today:

‘Your illness does not define you’